Archives for posts with tag: Aleutian Islands

Fishing Bald Eagle

This Eagle is as much a fisherman as we are. More so, the fish everyday of their life. I never mind letting them pick through our nets for the scraps.

Busting Ice

Every winter the Bering Sea Fishermen have to break ice off the boat. The ice builds up in the high winds, and the sea spray will stick to the cold surface of the boat. Sea water starts freezing at 28 degrees F.
You can see in this photo, how the small pipe railing has grown to very large (and heavy) proportions. If out do not take the time to remove the ice, the buildup can get dangerously heavy, and has been know to cause boats to roll over from being so top heavy.
This particular day, we got a break in the wind, and the sun came out. A combination that helps the guys with the task of ice removal.

Arctic Storm, 290' 110 people onboard.

This made the cover of Pacific Fishing Magazine. It was blowing about 40 kts. and 15 degrees out. The shipo has ice all over it. Fishing was slow and the weather was so lousy, I was cruising by, and got pretty close. The Arctic Storm was trawling at the time. The Capt. whom I know called me on the radio and said “Hey Jack, what are you doing?” I said, “Hey Brian, I am going to make you famous”…and by golly, we did! As I was hanging out the small window, freezing my ears and hands off, trying to get the shot!

Courts in session

Lined up like the honorable judges. These mature Bald Eagles seem to be waiting for something to happen….:-)

F/V Arcturus

200 miles north of the Aleutian Island Chain, 3AM…. deep in the dark and cold heart of the Bering Sea. Bring aboard 150 tons of pure Alaska Pollock. Capt. and crew are all seasoned and professional. Quietly going about about their business….. “Harvesting protein from a hostile environment”

The Gathering

There are so many Bald Eagles, at times too many to count, that will come on the boat….. As I get better organized, I will be able to post plenty of photos of this unique phenomena.

The look

It is amazing to me how Bald Eagles can looks so different from one another. After photographing them for a while now, and being so close to big flocks, I start to recognize the individuals.